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  • UCLA scientists and engineers have developed a new process for assembling semico

     Japo_Japo updated 1 month, 1 week ago 1 Member · 1 Post
  • Japo_Japo

    Member
    September 10, 2021 at 10:30 am

    In a development that could pave the way for efficiently cooling the components of quantum computers, researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute have successfully used laser light to cool a semiconductor membrane from room temperature down to minus 269 degrees Celsius. It relies on complex interactions between the properties of the semiconductor, movement of the membrane, and the optical resonances.

    Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute have combined two worlds – quantum physics and nano physics, and this has led to the discovery of a new method for laser cooling semiconductor membranes. Semiconductors are vital components in solar cells, LEDs and many other electronics, and the efficient cooling of components is important for future quantum computers and ultrasensitive sensors. The new cooling method works quite paradoxically by heating the material! Using lasers, researchers cooled membrane fluctuations to minus 269 degrees C. The results are published in the scientific journal, Nature Physics.

    “In experiments, we have succeeded in achieving a new and efficient cooling of a solid material by using lasers. We have produced a semiconductor membrane with a thickness of 160 nanometers and an unprecedented surface area of 1 by 1 millimeter. In the experiments, we let the membrane interact with the laser light in such a way that its mechanical movements affected the light that hit it. We carefully examined the physics and discovered that a certain oscillation mode of the membrane cooled from room temperature down to minus 269 degrees C, which was a result of the complex and fascinating interplay between the movement of the membrane, the properties of the semiconductor and the optical resonances,” explains Koji Usami, associate professor at Quantop at the Niels Bohr Institute.

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