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  • Nreal Air sunglasses let you watch TV in AR

     Japo_Japo updated 1 month, 4 weeks ago 1 Member · 1 Post
  • Japo_Japo

    Member
    October 1, 2021 at 2:08 pm

    Ever wish you could watch YouTube videos through your sunglasses? That’s pretty much what augmented reality (AR) glasses company Nreal is going for with the Nreal Air announced today. With a light, 2.72 ounce (77 g) weight and micro-OLED display, the Nreal Air is just what you need to finally watch Parks and Recreation in an actual park.

    Since Nreal released the Nreal Light in 2019, AR tech has evolved so hardware offerings can be smaller. The Nreal Air is 27 percent lighter than the Nreal Light (3.74 ounces/106 g), although it also comes with less functionality. There’s no handtracking or spatial awareness, so you can’t interact with what you see. Instead, you’ll have to rely on an app on your smartphone, which must be tethered to the Nreal Air for it to work (as is the case with the Nreal Light).

    This is because the Nreal Air isn’t about dragging and dropping furniture around your virtual home or trying on outfits via a virtual avatar before buying, or other, more interactive AR applications. Instead, Nreal is targeting the Nreal Air primarily at watching videos on YouTube and other streaming apps.

    The Nreal Air looks like a pair of sunnies, but Nreal claims they’re optimized for both indoor and outdoor wear. The goggles can cast a virtual display measuring up to 201 inches diagonally when viewed from 19.69 feet (6 m) away. The display promises 49 pixels per degree (compared to 42 pixels per degree on the Nreal Light) and runs at a 90 Hz refresh rate, meaning it updates with new information more frequently than many mainstream monitors and TVs, which are often at 60 Hz.Ever wish you could watch YouTube videos through your sunglasses? That’s pretty much what augmented reality (AR) glasses company Nreal is going for with the Nreal Air announced today. With a light, 2.72 ounce (77 g) weight and micro-OLED display, the Nreal Air is just what you need to finally watch Parks and Recreation in an actual park.

    Since Nreal released the Nreal Light in 2019, AR tech has evolved so hardware offerings can be smaller. The Nreal Air is 27 percent lighter than the Nreal Light (3.74 ounces/106 g), although it also comes with less functionality. There’s no handtracking or spatial awareness, so you can’t interact with what you see. Instead, you’ll have to rely on an app on your smartphone, which must be tethered to the Nreal Air for it to work (as is the case with the Nreal Light).

    This is because the Nreal Air isn’t about dragging and dropping furniture around your virtual home or trying on outfits via a virtual avatar before buying, or other, more interactive AR applications. Instead, Nreal is targeting the Nreal Air primarily at watching videos on YouTube and other streaming apps.

    The Nreal Air looks like a pair of sunnies, but Nreal claims they’re optimized for both indoor and outdoor wear. The goggles can cast a virtual display measuring up to 201 inches diagonally when viewed from 19.69 feet (6 m) away. The display promises 49 pixels per degree (compared to 42 pixels per degree on the Nreal Light) and runs at a 90 Hz refresh rate, meaning it updates with new information more frequently than many mainstream monitors and TVs, which are often at 60 Hz.

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