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  • Blocking space rocks for Venus

     FateXD updated 2 months, 1 week ago 2 Members · 2 Posts
  • Japo_Japo

    Member
    September 25, 2021 at 2:33 pm

    In the second paper, the scientists modeled giant impacts in the inner solar system, how those collisions affected planet formation and how the orbits of the involved objects evolved over time. They found that Earth likely acted as a sort of shield for Venus, taking the brunt of hit-and-run first impacts. Those initial collisions slowed the impactors down, setting the stage for accretionary mergers with Venus later.

    “The prevailing idea has been that it doesn’t really matter if planets collide and don’t merge right away, because they are going to run into each other again at some point and merge then,” Alexandre Emsenhuber, the lead author of the second study, said in the same statement.

    “But that is not what we find,” said Emsenhuber, who performed the research during a postdoctoral fellowship in Asphaug’s lab at LPL and is now at Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich, Germany. “We find they end up more frequently becoming part of Venus, instead of returning back to Earth. It’s easier to go from Earth to Venus than the other way around.” (This is because Venus lies closer to the sun, whose powerful gravity draws objects in.)

  • FateXD

    Member
    September 25, 2021 at 4:26 pm

    That means Earth is acting like shield for Venus?

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